96.Can you help me Moderated discussion and help for gluten free, coeliac, celiac, wheat allergies or intolerance, Cookery and recipes

Can you help me: from on 2001-09-14

Hi,
I'm currently carrying out a GCSE food technology project in England on the gluten-free diet and I was wondering whether anybody out there who follows this diet could answer a few questions for me:
*Do you have any difficulties with e.g. ready made meals, eating out etc.?
*What qualities do you look for from a gluten free product?
*Do you have any preferences for the meals you eat e.g. what nutrients you want?
*What foods do you want to eat but can't?

Thanks everyone,
Laura

Re: Can you help me: from on 2001-09-17

Eating out is always a problem as you are never quite sure what is in the meal. Wheat flour can get into almost anything - including chips!

Peter

Re: Can you help me: from on 2001-09-17

Eating out is always a problem as you are never quite sure what is in the meal. Wheat flour can get into almost anything - including chips!

Peter

Re: Can you help me: from on 2001-09-19

Ready-made meals are difficult because wheat/gluten masquerades under many other names (eg modified starch). Sainsbury's and Tesco are now labelling shelves and own-brand products as gluten-free or containing wheat, cow's milk etc, so shopping is becoming easier.

Eating out involves double-checking with the chef (waiting staff don't often know how the food is made). For a special meal, it's worth checking ahead with the restauarnt that there will be adequate selection on that evening's menu. Good restaurants don't mind making things to order, but many 'chain' restaurants don't have the flexibility.

Gluten-free products should taste just like the real thing. It's almost as bad as not being able to eat something at all when you try some of the filth they put on the market.

The things I miss are simple things like sandwiches, although in London, a select few shops are now making a limited range of wheat-free sandwiches (if you fancy travelling and paying the price). Corn/maize pasta is pretty good (especially if you find an Italian-made brand), but fresh ravioli is nowhere to be found.

Not being able to eat wheat used to make me very depressed, so much so that I felt like crying when I was doing my food shopping. Things have got markedly better as awareness (therefore product availability) has grown and the Internet is a great help as well. But you have to keep your eyes peeled for new products and get all your friends and family to keep a loaf of wheat-free bread in their freezer for when you visit. There's nothing like the smell of toast

Re: Can you help me: from on 2001-10-02

laura,
All my life i have had to live, on and off, on a gluten free diet,(constanstly from aged 5 until 17 when i rebeled) having been diagnosed as a ceoliac at the age of 5/6? about 1963/4.
i was used as a guinee? pig for about 7 years by the specialist Dr Mosely at St Marys Hospital Portsmouth, hants, im not sure, but i belive, we were the first family to have two ceoliac's in the same family.

As for your questions the foods and products available now are getting better and, more people and manufactures are aware of the food requirements, this is a lot of the reason why i can say i can live on or off the diet... a bit of a remmission.

Still can't eat pizzas without taking 3 days to recover.........

When i was first put on the diet i was not able to eat bread, cakes ,sweets, sugar, cereals, milk, any tinned or proceesed food, and there were virtuatly NO products available for sale, god bless my mum she really tried, but unfortunatly no matter how she tried, back then, providing for a gluten free diet was wheat starch for cooking and fruit, meat and veg, (lucky i liked them)

The diet has got a lot better and in fact, some resturants now have gluten free options on the menu, but i cant go out and eat food like most, i know that if im invited out for meals, rather than put the host under unbealiveable pressure to provide for my diet, I'll accept that i'll have the s***s for the next three day.

Laura, probably not the answer your looking for but its honest

Re: Can you help me: from on 2001-10-02

laura,
All my life i have had to live, on and off, on a gluten free diet,(constanstly from aged 5 until 17 when i rebeled) having been diagnosed as a ceoliac at the age of 5/6? about 1963/4.
i was used as a guinee? pig for about 7 years by the specialist Dr Mosely at St Marys Hospital Portsmouth, hants, im not sure, but i belive, we were the first family to have two ceoliac's in the same family.

As for your questions the foods and products available now are getting better and, more people and manufactures are aware of the food requirements, this is a lot of the reason why i can say i can live on or off the diet... a bit of a remmission.

Still can't eat pizzas without taking 3 days to recover.........

When i was first put on the diet i was not able to eat bread, cakes ,sweets, sugar, cereals, milk, any tinned or proceesed food, and there were virtuatly NO products available for sale, god bless my mum she really tried, but unfortunatly no matter how she tried, back then, providing for a gluten free diet was wheat starch for cooking and fruit, meat and veg, (lucky i liked them)

The diet has got a lot better and in fact, some resturants now have gluten free options on the menu, but i cant go out and eat food like most, i know that if im invited out for meals, rather than put the host under unbealiveable pressure to provide for my diet, I'll accept that i'll have the s***s for the next three day.

Laura, probably not the answer your looking for but its honest

Re: Can you help me: from on 2001-10-23

I have been told I have Celiac. It is life long diet that one should not cheat on. The diease goes into remission if you stay on the diet. Eating out is a real challenge. You never what the chef has put into the food. It is best to stick with plain cooked meats and potatoes. Take your own dressing for the salads.
Going to the grocery store is a real nightmare. You have to read every label for gluten free ingrediants, and the list of possibilitys are endless.
I really crave sweets, donuts, pie ,cake, candy ect. all the snack foods.
I hope that helps.
Stan

Re: Can you help me: from on 2002-12-01

Hi Laura,

I was diagnosed with coeliac disease only one year ago after years of pain. Just after starting my gluten-free diet I felt so happy and energetic, I could wake up early in the morning and do sport every day without feeling fatigue. Even though the diet implied giving up nice food, the physical energy I discovered in me compensated for that. I really miss pizza, gnocchi, lasagne and especially freshly baked bread and croissants...
After a year I realise that coeliac disease improved my health, but made my social life really difficult. Eating out is always very risky, and I advise you to join the local group of the Coeliac Society in the UK for information on local restaurants supplying gluten-free food. If you are invited for dinner at a friend's, make him/her aware of your condition, you will see that they will be happy to meet your dietary requirements. You can help them by bringing your own bread or sauces with you. Also, I always keep gluten-free snacks in my handbag when I travel, as it is not easy to find gluten-free food in train stations or airports. By the way, if you like shopping like I do, IKEA and John Lewis stores have restaurants and bars supplying delicious gluten-free cakes...shopping and cakes...what a nice combination!.
Hope this useful!!! Grazia

Can you help me: from Michelle on 2007-11-14

Hi Laura, i've been a sillyak for a long time and not diagnosed properly because doctors are full of useless information here in Australia. By the time i had the test i'd been off gluten/wheat so the test came back palse negative. Anyway, eating has always been hard beacause i have lactose intol, diagnosed IBS and if that's not enough, i cant have a lot of sugar. I hardly use the foods that are sold for coeliacs, i take the 'bull by the horns' and create my own diet. I have grilled fish and meats with steamed vegetables. Salads are easy to make with tuna &/or eggs. There are many curries one can use too but i choose to keep it SIMPLE. I need alot of nutrients and vitamins because i exercise 6 days a week so preferences in food is crucial. I would love to sink my teeth into a burger from the fish & chips shop or a wood fired pizza or even chips from McDonalds BUT i choose not to because i'm better off. Recently i went to a gluten-free expo and i was shocked and disapointed with the selection they had there, dont get me wrong there was a LOT... of crappy junk food saturated in oil and sugar. YUK!!! These foods are great for the short term but will make coeliacs turn into obese diabetics! Lets go back to basics :) Cheers

Can you help me: from Jan Horner on 2008-09-26

Hi Laura,



I was found to have coeliac disease a few years back after years of suffering.



It is very difficult to eat out in what you would refer to as normal 'dining out'. The reason being you cannot be 100\% certain your food has not been contaminated with other foods containing gluten. I work as a service co-ordinator between two hospitals and neither of these cater for coeliacs. There are restaurants that do cater for people like me but not many.



The gluten free ready made meals you can buy from Sainsburys - Tescos etc are OK but not that brilliant and they are quite expensive. The Pizzas are probably the best. My biggest bug is the bread to be honest it's awful and you have to either refresh or toast; if you are out and about how can you do this. I would love to bite into a crusty roll!



I mostly eat chicken, pork, lamb and turkey, loads of fresh veg, potates, salads and fruit (sometimes too much fruit plays havoc with my digestive system). But if would be nice to be able to have a really tasty ready meal to pop in the oven.



I think probably one of the most important nutrients is one that keeps the bones strong.



I would like to have more choice of savory sauces that taste yummy.



Good luck with your exams if I can be of any more help just e-mail.

Regards,

Jan