47.fine tuning it - more questions Moderated discussion and help for Food Combining and the Hay diet, Cookery and recipes, Starch or Protein

fine tuning it - more questions: from on 2003-03-11

so, i go the newer book i ordered (food combining for vegeterians), and it does cover allot of things, but still, more questions arise:

1. i never got a reply regarding humus. i always thought that beans are protein, but this book says all legumes with the exception of soy, are starch, which would make humus starch, and me a happy man, since i can eat my pita with my humus again :) - is this true?

2. coconut milk - starch, protein, neutral?

3. mango - starch, protein, neutral?

4. soy souce - starch, protein, neutral?

5. is it really bad for me to have balsamic vinegar? and if not, - starch, protein, neutral?

p.s.
thanks for you dedication in this forum, peter. since i found your site, i've forwarded it to over 10 people, and most of them have started on the diet :) you're helping to change the way people eat, one at a time

Re: fine tuning it - more questions: from Peter on 2003-03-11

Peas and beans contain a higher proportion of protein than whole grains, and white flour contains the least protein.
Soya contains the highest protein of any bean, and tofu is the concentrated protein, but soya is not a particularly good food to eat in quantity.

The inside of a potato is almost pure starch, but the skin contains more protein.

Your humus, made with chick peas and olive oil, will be low in protein and will not be that different from the protein level in bread, so I would regard humus on bread as a healthy option.

coconut milk and mango are both mostly water - you would have to eat very large quantities to get significant protein, so regard them as neutral.

Soy sauce itself is slightly different. Like strongly flavoured extracts like vegimite or marmite, it may fool the digestive system into behaving as though it was eating a largely protein meal. For this reason I would only eat these as part of a protein meal, not as spreads on bread.

Vinegar I would regard as neutral in small amounts ( for people of western origin who have digestive enzymes for alcohol and vinegar - but not for people of eastern origin )

Peter

Re: fine tuning it - more questions: from on 2003-03-18

so, to finalize it:
you would classify most of the beans as part of a protein meal, right?
and this includes garbonzo beans, black bean and pinto...

there seem to be allot of things that different from one book to next. i believe that as long as i keep the \%80 fruits and vegetables rule, i'll figure out the food combning thing eventually. and my body does feel great. lost 15 pounds in 3 weeks and i have allot more energy..
tahnks again for all your help peter

Re: fine tuning it - more questions: from on 2003-05-06

I am vegetarian and have always combined all legumes (beans) as starches except for soy/soya which I treat as protein and I feel fine doing it.. not that that makes me right of course! ;-)

Alison

Re fine tuning it - more questions: from Beth on 2006-08-17

What about decaffeinated coffee? I know there's still some caffeine left, but should it be considered an acid food? (I haven't read anything about caffeine vis-a-vis food combining yet, but I only drink decaffeinated coffee or tea, no soda, etc.)

Re fine tuning it - more questions: from Beth on 2006-08-17

What about decaffeinated coffee? I know there's still some caffeine left, but should it be considered an acid food? (I haven't read anything about caffeine vis-a-vis food combining yet, but I only drink decaffeinated coffee or tea, no soda, etc.)

Re fine tuning it - more questions: from Veggie on 2006-10-26

Legumes - a class of vegetables that includes beans, peas and lentils are typically low in fat, contain no cholesterol, and are high in protein, folate, potassium, iron and magnesium.
Soybeans, one type of legume, are unique among beans because they contain all of the amino acids needed to make a complete protein, just like meat.
-Tofu is a curd made from soybeans
-Soy milk is a soy beverage made by grinding soybeans and mixing them with water
- since humus is made from chick peas (legumes) they are high in protein. But also has fat contents because of olive oil & tahini sause(sesame seeds)
In a vegiterian diet the legumes play a very important role as they are the main source of protein.

Coconut milk (not coconut water, both are different) is very high in fat.. contains 80 to 88\% fat.. depending on the dilution. does contain protien but 2-3 \%. is main ingredient in many thai & south indian curries.

Mango - high in carbohidrates & low in protien. lots of fible. but a very healthy food.

Re fine tuning it - more questions: from Rich Trotman on 2010-11-14

I've always been confused by the pulses question.



I get the soya bean thing, as it's a complete protein.



However, like with many subjects relating to food combining, there's a deal of confusion, including among those who follow the "Hay System."



Some books insist that, if consumed at all, pulses should be part of a protein meal.



However, Jackie LeTissier in her book Food Combining For Vegetarians, seems to place pulses along with starch foods.



Like the fruit after meals issue, it does serve to confuse the issue.



On the fruit situation, I stick with what Doris Grant recommended, otherwise I'd start to find the whole thing too restricting.



Rich.